Appreciation of the perfect scotch whisky – The Black Dog Triple Gold Reserve (Episode 4 – Final Part)






Appreciation of the perfect scotch whisky – The Black Dog Triple Gold Reserve
(Episode 4 – Final Part)





This post is the final part of appreciating the perfect scotch whisky – The Black Dog triple Gold Reserve. In my last post, I wrote about, how Barleys from field is turned into Black Dog TGR blended scotch whisky. In this final episode, I will write about the final stages in preparation of scotch and will share an interesting story about how and why the 4 whisky producing regions are perfectly married in it.




Single malt whisky and grain whisky, after they are matured separately in bourbon casks, are blended and put into special oloroso Sherry casks. The Sherry casks are a tad expensive compared to American bourbon Casks. Also, it needs to be ensured that the Sherry casks are not dried up by the time they reach the maturation place. Some amount of Sherry wine is left inside the oloroso Sherry casks before it is shipped to Scotland. The third maturation phase of Black Dog Triple Gold Reserve is carried out in these Sherry casks sourced from Spain.




Black Dog is known for its consistent quality and taste of its Scotch Whisky. But the truth is, it is not at all an easy job to maintain the same taste and quality in all the bottles, especially when the malt and grain whiskies are coming from different sources. It is the art and perfection of Master Blenders that ensure the taste and aroma of the Whiskies are maintained within an acceptable range. The master Blender performs some quality checks on the whisky before approving it for bottling process.




Now an interesting story about how and why the 4 whisky producing regions are perfectly married in it.

Wikipedia states that as of 23 November 2009, the Scotch Whisky Regulations 2009 (SWR) define and regulate the production, labeling, packaging as well as the advertising of Scotch whisky in the United Kingdom. They replace previous regulations that focused solely on production. International trade agreements have the effect of making some provisions of the SWR apply in various other countries as well as in the UK. The SWR define "Scotch whisky" as whisky that is:

1. Produced at a distillery in Scotland from water and malted barley (to which only whole grains of other cereals may be added) all of which have been:

a. Processed at that distillery into a mash
b. Converted at that distillery to a fermentable substrate only by endogenous enzyme systems
c. Fermented at that distillery only by adding yeast
d. Distilled at an alcoholic strength by volume of less than 94.8% (190 US proof).

2. Wholly matured in an excise warehouse in Scotland in oak casks of a capacity not exceeding 700 liters (185 US gal; 154 imp gal) for at least three years.

3. Retaining the color, aroma, and taste of the raw materials used in, and the method of, its production and maturation.

4. Containing no added substances, other than water and plain (E150A) caramel coloring.

5. Comprising a minimum alcoholic strength by volume of 40% (80 US proof).

Black Dog’s Scotches follow all the above rules and are made using the Barley that is grown in the Lowlands, water from the Speyside, distilled in the Islands and finally matured in the Highlands. These Scotches are matured in the Highlands for a reason. The weather is fairly constant through the year and it is neither too cold nor too warm. It is just right for the wood to breathe and allow the scotch to soak in the flavor.







Disclaimer: This content is meant only for people above the age of 25

Suman

Dreamer, Blogger, Writer, Foodie, Movie buff, Public Relations. Contributor for The New Indian Express and recently started a news publishing website 'Unkrate'.

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